Book & Movie Reviews, Reviews

Life In Between the Hyphen: First-Generation Characters Creating An Identity #BookReview

Book lovers, what’s a book that has helped you learn about your identity?

One of my top reads in my September Wrap Up (yes, this book review is that late) was Fruit Of The Lemon by Andrea Levy. In her novel, Levy describes the journey of self-discovery her character, Faith Jackson, takes to crafting her identity and learning about her Jamaican family’s heritage.

Cover for Fruit of the Lemon

As a first-generation child of Jamaican immigrants, who are a part of the working class, Faith is set adrift between her life in Britain and her family’s original cultural heritage. Surrounded by White friends and flatmates, Faith is the victim of casual racism and constant humiliation at her peers’ hands.

Faith’s parents and brother, on the other hand, treat her as an anomaly. To her parents, she is rudderless with no understanding of her Jamaican heritage. Yet, neither parent will tell her what she needs to know to grow closer to the country they love so dearly. Faith’s brother sees her as disconnected from her roots and writes her off as a “lost cause,” as he finds his foot in between the hyphen as a British Jamaican person.

With all these conflicting opinions about herself, it is no wonder Faith finds herself confused about who she is meant to be. It is not until a trip to the “Motherland” that Faith begins to craft an identity for herself.

What I most enjoyed about Levy’s story is that it is purely a character study. The shifts in the story feel akin to real life. Levy’s choice to explore the “hyphenated identity” of her character is something that any BIPOC person can understand regardless of their country or their economic class.

Author, Andrea Levy (Photo Credit: Liam Duke/Camera Press)

This is because we all eventually go through some metamorphosis that moves us further away from our ancestral “home base” be it through our economic status or geographical location. And due to this change, we often face scrutiny within our community and outside forces, who either see us as pretenders or as phony in how we present ourselves.

Therefore, it’s easy to understand the struggles Faith faces as she battles the remnants of colonialization and casual racism to become self-actualized.

Have you read this book?

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Book & Movie Reviews, Reviews

Come On In, America is Waiting!: The Immigrant & America, A #BookReview #BlogTour

“No one leaves home unless home is the mouth of a shark.” 
― Warsan Shire, Teaching My Mother How to Give Birth

According to the Migration Policy Institute, as of 2018, there are roughly more than 44.7 immigrants residing in the United States to date. Immigrants make up 13.7% of the American population and have helped build up every imaginable industry in America from the government (e.g., Can you say, “Founding Fathers?”) to technology and science, to our food industry.

Yet, this group is frequently under attack and lauded as “leeches” on American resources even while they are recruited to keep America running smoothly by doing tasks that others won’t or can’t do. This is often done for little to no pay. With the current administration’s smear campaign against immigration, it’s refreshing to read stories by authors with firsthand experience of the true labor that goes into immigrating in the anthology, Come On In.

The anthology was edited by Adi Alsaid and is comprised of fourteen authors who hail from a variety of global backgrounds ranging from Fiji to Ecuador. I loved this anthology because each author shows that it takes courage and tenacity to leave the world you once knew behind to embrace a new life.

Likewise, each author has their own unique voice and tells their story from different vantage points of immigrating to America. For instance, some writers speak of the pain that comes with confronting TSA when you arrive in America and ICE if you are unfortunate enough to be deported. Other authors in the anthology tell of being told that they’re moving, but their older siblings are being left behind because they weren’t approved for a visa. Still, in other stories, the author presents first-generation American born children who struggle with building an identity in-between the proverbial hyphen of their parents’ native land and the American country they grew up in.

All these stories that Alsaid has edited together show that the immigrant experience, like everything else, cannot be told in a single story. Even within the same family, the story and one’s outlook on being an immigrant can vary.

This anthology is an excellent initial resource for anyone who has questions about what it is like for people who make the journey to leave their homelands and move to a new country. The stories in this collection will force readers to face their assumptions about who immigrants are.

If you go into this collection with an open mind, the stories will force you to look deeper into the question of why people choose to leave their homes, and if there even is a choice for some people. Likewise, for readers who love good storytelling, this anthology is perfect because of the nuanced viewpoints presented in the collection.

Thank you to Hear Our Voices Book Tours for granting me an e-galley of this anthology and allowing me to be a part of the promo tour! Check their site for more stops on the tour!

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