Book & Movie Reviews, Reviews

A #BookReview of #AUniverseOfWishes, A #WeNeedDiverseBooks Anthology – #BookTour

Thanks to Terminal Tours, I was able to get an advanced readers copy of the fantasy-themed short story anthology, A Universe of Wishes: A We Need Diverse Books Anthology. This anthology was edited by Dhonielle Clayton and included authors like Samira Ahmed, Zoraida Córdova, Kwame Mbalia, Tochi Onyebuchi, and many more authors of colors.

In her editor’s letter, Clayton talks about growing up as a reader of color and not seeing herself in fantasy novels. This was something that I could relate to. While I always had stories, like The Logan Family Saga by Mildred D. Taylor or The Skin I’m In by Sharon G. Flake, to read if I wanted to see real-world images of myself in the 90s if I wanted to read a fantasy novel with African-American characters, my pickings were slim.

With the We Need Diverse campaign inception in 2014, the field of publishing has been opened up to the point where authors of color have been given the space to tell their own stories and even been granted acclaim for their work. Even though there is more work to be done in the industry, based on the annual statistics from the Children’s Cooperative Book Center (CCBC) and Lee & Low.

Reading through A Universe of Wishes, I was pleasantly surprised to read stories, like “Liberia” by Kwame Mbalia, where readers are shown a story of where the love of one’s family takes center stage. Having Mbalia speak to African-Americans’ collectivist nature and centering the magic of this cultural trait warmed my heart.

Likewise, reading “The Takeback Tango” by Rebecca Roanhorse, where a teen thief sets out to reclaim her planet’s artifacts, is reminiscent of my favorite scene from Black Panther with Kilmonger in the British Museum. Having Roanhorse show the power that comes from taking ownership over one’s heritage is what I love to see!

As a lover of Disney’s Tangled, “Longer Than the Threads of Time” by Zoraida Córdova was also a treat. However, like so many stories in this anthology, I wanted the stories to be so much longer. 

A Universe of Wishes holds all the magic a reader could want. Having authors of color flex their muscles and show creativity outside the normal realm of “suffering” that so many BIPOC writers are pigeonholed into to get their break in the publishing industry was refreshing.

If you enjoyed this anthology, I’d highly recommend looking into all the featured writers’ works and read Her Stories by Virginia Hamilton, which was one of my favorite short story collections of African-American folktales and fairy tales as a kid.

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Book & Movie Reviews

The Struggle to “Find Yourself” as a Teen: Book Review for Forward Me Back to You by Mitali Perkins

“Some women get erased a little at a time, some all at once. Some reappear. Every woman who appears wrestles with the forces that would have her disappear. She struggles with the forces that would tell her story for her, or write her out of the story, the genealogy, the rights of man, the rule of law. The ability to tell your own story, in words or images, is already a victory, already a revolt.”Rebecca SolnitMen Explain Things to Me

On #InternationalWomensDay, I want to give a hearty shout out to all the women in the world that are taking up space and existing in the world. Give yourself a hug for all you’ve done and will do in this coming week!

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In February, I read Forward Me Back to You by Mitali Perkins. As a total read, this book was a hard one to get through due to subject matter, but also because of the pacing and choice of medium. Perkins writes this book as if it were a script in omnipotent third person narration. 

The general premise is that there are two teenagers, Kat and Ravi, who are both questioning their current existence and eventually travel to Kolkata, India to do mission work with an organization that traffics women. Kat is a mixed race girl of Afro-Latinx and white heritage. Her story starts from the point of her being sexually assaulted and forced to leave her school in California and move to Boston as a way of getting away from environmental triggers that remind her of her attack. Sadly, her story will be familiar to many women in the #MeTooMovement or #TimesUp era. 

Mitali Perkins

Ravi on the other hand is an adopted Indian boy that lives in Boston with his white parents, who adore him. Ravi has the feeling that there is something missing. Quiet, and seemingly only good with fixing cars, he is a background player in his own life. Determined to find the mother that abandoned him, Ravi attempts signs up for the mission trip in India and it leads him into a better understanding of himself and how he fits into his world.

While each of Perkins’ characters are well-written, I went in expecting to love the book, but ended up feeling uncomfortable reading it due to the odd choice to make the story appear as if it was a movie with each chapter heading. I have read other books from this author and loved them, but this one just wasn’t for me. I definitely could imagine it as a movie though.

I gave it 3 stars.

Where there any books in your February reading list that you would have turned into a movie if you had the chance?

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